Image from page 184 of “World survey by the Interchurch World Movement of North America : revised preliminary statement and budget ..” (1920)

Some cool internet income images:

Image from page 184 of “World survey by the Interchurch World Movement of North America : revised preliminary statement and budget ..” (1920)
internet income
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: worldsurveybyint00inte
Title: World survey by the Interchurch World Movement of North America : revised preliminary statement and budget ..
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors: Interchurch World Movement of North America
Subjects: Interchurch World Movement of North America
Publisher: New York : Interchurch press
Contributing Library: Princeton Theological Seminary Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
ed we wonder that soldiersreturning from a war that was fought and wonso largely by the application of scientific knowl-edge should immediately add a new impetusto technical education. The chart (page 181)omits all data concerning students in the pro-fessional schools and in the summer and othershort courses and does not show the unusualenrolment during the present college year. THE UNIVERSITIES DIVERSITYOF OPERATIONS IT MUST be remembered that the influenceof these institutions is not confined to thecircle of their resident students. A large partof the income is expended upon research workand this is carried through the extension de-partments to every corner of the state. AMERICAN EDUCATION: Tax-supported Institutions 181 RELATIVE GROWTH OF COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIESUNDER PUBLIC AND PRIVATE CONTROL (COLLEGE AND RESIDENT GRADUATE STUDENTS) •89^9092 94 96 98 OO 02 04 06 08 10 12 i4> 16 18 20275.000 250.000 225,000 200,000 175.000 150,000 125.000 100,000 75,000 50,000 25.000 CONTROL

Text Appearing After Image:
INJTHUTIONSUNDER PRIVATE CONtrRO 182 Tax-supported Institutions: AMERICAN EDUCATION The chart, showing income of one universityand fifty small colleges, illustrates the relativecost of maintaining one university as comparedwith fifty small colleges with twice the totalnumber of students. The chart does not andcannot bring out the fact that the universitiesare expending large sums of money in traveland libraries; in apparatus; in county agencies;and that by correspondence, extension lecturesand courses of study, and by many othermethods are striving to improve conditions inevery section of the several states throughoutthe country. The survey is making a study of this extra-mural work. It will disclose the opportunitiesawaiting the churches and it will show thatthe universities are inviting their cooperation. Under wise guidance and by the use of similarmethods the churches may give to the villagesand rural communities the same type of helpas that being given by these tax-supportedinsti

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 1172 of “The Ladies’ home journal” (1889)
internet income
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: ladieshomejourna65janwyet
Title: The Ladies’ home journal
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: Wyeth, N. C. (Newell Convers), 1882-1945
Subjects: Women’s periodicals Janice Bluestein Longone Culinary Archive
Publisher: Philadelphia : [s.n.]
Contributing Library: Internet Archive
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
premises, the Griffins are sensibly seeking a good and morecommodious home for her. But, until such a home is found, Wendygets the best as a member of the family and never mind the car—a veryGriffinish point of view. Gray hair or not, time has shown up more in the children. Benny,knee high to a duck in the first How America Lives, is tall as his fatherand, at fifteen, almost clear of the adolescent curse of the Henry Aldrichvoice. Jacquie (for Jacqueline, you remember), whom readers last sawall legs and hair ribbons on a new bicycle, in the February, 1940,Journal, is a mighty pretty high-school graduate who has alreadybeen earning a living wage for six months. But, striking as growthalways is when you check up on kids after several years, the maturingof time appears only to have brought these youngsters closer to theirparents—or rather to the family working-and-living partnership thatnever encouraged hard-and-fast division between parents and children. PHOTOGRAPHS BY MORRIS ENGEL

Text Appearing After Image:
IRENE Back in Cedar Rapids, Irene was known for her crazy hats, her dancing AULDEN Now sales manager for the Clayborne Manufacturing Company, inand her talents a- youngest president of the Omans Club. Now, as then, she Chicago, Aulden has tripled his income since 1940. Move to the big city, sodoes all her own housework, and wins the family vote as penny wisest. far, delights him: People come miles to see what we have on our doorstep. (18 • HOW AMERICA LIVES • We aim to solve the problems ofeach day to the best of our ability.

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 210 of “Old and new London : a narrative of its history, its people, and its places” (1873)
internet income
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: oldnewlondonnarr03thor
Title: Old and new London : a narrative of its history, its people, and its places
Year: 1873 (1870s)
Authors: Thornbury, Walter, 1828-1876
Subjects:
Publisher: London : Cassell, Petter, & Galpin
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
ing was largely rewarded in after life. Placed as a lad with a solicitor, whom he leftfor a merchants office, which he also resigned,eventually he was articled to one of the swornclerks of Chancery. At the expiration of hisarticles he qualified himself for the bar, but hadto wait long and patiently ere he was rewardedwith any practice. When briefs did at last fall to Soho Square.] SIR SAMUEL ROMILLY. 193 his lot, it very soon became manifest that they wereheld by a master, and the result was that a tide ofprosperity set in, and success came upon him likea flood. His income rose to about ^9,000 ayear, and in his diary he congratulated himself thathe did not press his father to buy him a seat in the 1806—the electors of Westminster having returnedhim to Parliament without the expenditure of ashilling on his part ; a great thing in those days ofbribery and corruption—and during the short ad-ministration of Mr. Grenville he was appointedSolicitor-General, and knighted. Nor was he dis-

Text Appearing After Image:
TIIE SIGN OF TilE MISCHIEF [sCC pa^C I96). Six Clerks Office. Romilly now rapidly rose todistinction in the Court of Chancery, where he wasdistinguished for his profound learning and forcibleeloquence ; and to him Lord Brougham has paidthe following tribute :— Romilly, by the force ofhis learning and talents, and the most spotlessintegrity, rose to the very height of professionalambition. He was beyond question or pretence ofrivalry the first man in the courts in this country.Romilly entered the House of Commons inII3–V01,. III. tinguished professionally only: but during hispolitical career he was listened to with rapt atten-tion, and a passage in one of his speeches in favourof the abolition of the slave-trade received thesingular honour of three distinct rounds of applausefrom the House. But Romillys grand claim to remembrance restsupon his humane efforts to mitigate the Draconiccode of English law, in which nearly three hundredcrimes, varying from murder to keeping company 194 O

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Show Buttons
Hide Buttons