Image from page 352 of “Bell telephone magazine” (1922)

A few nice improving internet connection images I found:

Image from page 352 of “Bell telephone magazine” (1922)
improving internet connection
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: belltelephonemag11amerrich
Title: Bell telephone magazine
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: American Telephone and Telegraph Company American Telephone and Telegraph Company. Information Dept
Subjects: Telephone
Publisher: [New York, American Telephone and Telegraph Co., etc.]
Contributing Library: Prelinger Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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e connected serially in the line at intervalsof about 2y2 miles. When these loading coils were first in-stalled, transmission was materially improved and very favor-able comments were received from the users of the service.Then, lightning and atmospheric moisture began to causetrouble. The troubles caused by lightning were soon over-come, but the moisture resulted in serious leakage difficulties,which gradually became worse as more dirt collected at theleakage points. These could not be overcome without radicalchanges, so that the loading coils were removed from the twoNew York-Chicago circuits in 1903. Work was continued onthe loading method and, as a result, about 1904 loading beganto be applied as a regular engineering proposition to lightergauge open wires, particularly wires 104 mils in diameter, forwhich circuits the leakage effects were relatively less serious.The loading coils were spaced about 8 miles apart, whichspacing remained standard for all future open-wire loading. 302

Text Appearing After Image:
Alexander Graham Bell at the Opening of the First New York-Chicago Telephone Line. NEW YORK-CHICAGO TELEPHONE CIRCUITS While none of these loaded 104-mil circuits went into serviceas direct New York-Chicago circuits, some were provided asway circuits which were no doubt connected together from timeto time to handle New York-Chicago business. At about the same time that this early work on loading wasin progress, other work was also in progress on developing thephantoming method. In this method balanced transform-ers are connected to the terminals of two similar circuits con-stituting a phantom group. By making connections to themid-points of the line windings of these transformers, an addi-tional circuit called a phantom is obtained. Thus a 50per cent increase in the number of circuits is obtained withoutstringing additional wires. After overcoming various troubles,not the least of which was the tendency of the circuits to cross-talk unduly into each other, this phantoming method becam

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 416 of “Bell telephone magazine” (1922)
improving internet connection
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: belltelephone6667mag00amerrich
Title: Bell telephone magazine
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: American Telephone and Telegraph Company American Telephone and Telegraph Company. Information Dept
Subjects: Telephone
Publisher: [New York, American Telephone and Telegraph Co., etc.]
Contributing Library: Prelinger Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
third party be-fore establishing the connection for athree-way conference. New Portable Phone Developed An experimental lineless extensiontelephone — a battery-operated porta-ble unit that performs the major func-tions of a regular telephone set — willsoon undergo field trials in the Bostonand Phoenix areas. The unit connectsvia a radio link to a fixed stationwhich, in turn, is connected to a tele-phone line or extension in the regulartelephone network. Unlike walkie-talkies and push-to-talk telephones, the new cordless tele-phone provides simultaneous two-wayconversation, as well as dialing andringing. Designed to be carried on abelt or in an overcoat pocket, thephone now has a range of from 100to 1500 feet from the fixed station. The new phone is expected to bemost useful in such locations as a con-struction site, on a convention hallfloor, or in other situations that re-quire temporary service, particularly ifmobility is needed or if running tele-phone wire would be difficult.

Text Appearing After Image:
Overseas Calls Improved The transmission quality of overseastelephone calls will soon be con-siderably improved with new high fre-quency radio equipment developedjointly by Bell Telephone Laboratoriesand the British Post Office. The equip-ment, which has been successfullytested between New York and BuenosAires, performs almost as well undernormal atmospheric conditions asmodern coaxial ocean cable. Duringunfavorable conditions, the systemperforms better than conventionalshortwave circuits. The new equip-ment reduces fading and noise. Information Service Demonstrated A new service which permits studentsand teachers to have telephone accessto a library of recorded informationwas demonstrated at the AmericanManagement Associations recent Edu-cation and Training Exposition in NewYork City. The service, which will be offeredto schools and colleges this fall by theBell System, will enable students andfaculty to call the schools resourcecenter and hear recordings on a wideariety of subjects

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

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