Image from page 36 of “Revised and enlarged ed. of the science of railways” (1800)

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Image from page 36 of “Revised and enlarged ed. of the science of railways” (1800)
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Identifier: sciencerailways01kirk
Title: Revised and enlarged ed. of the science of railways
Year: 1800 (1800s)
Authors: Kirkman, Marshall Monroe, 1842-1921
Subjects: Transportation Railroads
Publisher: New York : The World railway publishing co.
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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829Delaware A Hudson Canal Railroad. Allen was the engineer. Other locomotives w^ereconstructed and placed insuccessful operation in England during the periodI have named; thus, one (in 1829) for the ShuttEnd Railway, at Kingswinford. It was at this time—September 15th, 1830—that the event wliich so impressed the worldoccurred, namely, the opening of the Liverpool& Manchester Railway. So late as 1829 the own-ers of that property were still in doubt as towhether to use liorses, or locomotives, or station-ary engines with endless chains. To solve theirdoubts they determined to have a competitive EVOL urn)X of locomoti k. 29 trial of locomotives. It occurred near Manches-ter in the latter part of the year 1829. Thereward was twenty-five hundred dollars for thelocomotive which should prove to be the mostsuccessful. Three machines competed, amongthem Stephensons Rocket, which deservedlyreceived the preference. These experiments con-vinced those interested of the value of the loco-

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Stephensons • Rocket. 1830. This engine hauled the first train at the open-ing of the Liverpool Sc Manchester Railway. motive, and they accordingly gave Stephensonorders for seven other machines, all of whichtook part in the great procession that attendedthe opening of the Liverpool & Manchester road,on the 15th of September, 1830. The North-umbrian, which had a speed of thirty-six milesan hour, headed the procession as being in allrespects the best of its type. 30 RAILWAY EQUIPMENT. George Stephenson and his son Robert attainedgreat influence in connection with railway sub-jects because of their ingenuit}^ and talents. The}^are said to have improved the steam blast, whichenabled the Rocket to make sufficient steamto haul a passenger train at the rate of thirty-five miles an hour.* The w^heels of this locomo-tive had little side play and on this account itwas necessary that the track should not varygreatly from a straight line. This necessityadded greatly to the cost of the road

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Image from page 440 of “The magazine of American history with notes and queries” (1877)
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Identifier: magazineofamericv13stev
Title: The magazine of American history with notes and queries
Year: 1877 (1870s)
Authors: Stevens, John Austin, 1827-1910. ed. cn DeCosta, B. F. (Benjamin Franklin), 1831-1904. ed. cn Johnston, Henry Phelps, 1842-1923, ed. cn Lamb, Martha J. (Martha Joanna), 1829-1893. ed. cn Pond, Nathan Gillett, 1832-1894 ed Abbatt, William, 1851-1935, comp
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Publisher: New York : A.S. Barnes
Contributing Library: Allen County Public Library Genealogy Center
Digitizing Sponsor: Internet Archive

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ssie.On the long voyage, there was time for friendship to ripen into love, andthat time was well improved. On their arrival in the City of BrotherlyLove, they were met by Doctor Benjamin Rush with the news of heruncles death, and so the young couple, Christopher Raymond Perry andSarah Alexander, were married at once, and removed to the Perry farm inRhode Island. From this marriage have descended probably more naval officers thanfrom any one American connection, that of the Nicholsons alone excepted.Of the eight children were three daughters : Anna, became the wife ofCommodore George Rodgers, killed in Charleston Harbor, 1863. Anothermarried Dr. Butler, of South Carolina, the father of Matthew CalbraithButler, United States Senator ; and the third remained single. Of the sons,Oliver Hazard was the hero of Lake Erie. James Alexander, who was inthe boat with his older brother, the commodore, when crossing from theSt. Lawrence to the Niagara, had his hat pierced and a curl of his hair cut

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422 COMMODORE MATTHEW CALBRAITH PERRY off by bullets. He was drowned at Valparaiso in 1821, while trying torescue a companion. The fourth and fifth sons, Nathaniel and Raymond,were both naval officers. Matthew was the third son in this decidedly naval family. Theirfather being away at sea most of the time, holding the rank of Captainin the American navy, their training fell upon the young mother, andsublimely did she fulfill her charge. Those who knew her in later lifespeak of her as a Spartan mother, a grand old lady. Her ancestrywas Scotch. She was descended from Sir William Wallace, and wasproud of it. Having emigrated to North Ireland, her people, thoughProtestants, were involved in the Irish rebellion in Cromwells time. In herchildhood she had often listened to accounts of the battles which hadtaken place on her native soil, and now, as a mother, she loved to recountthem again to her children. Believing that her people were the bravest inthe world, she fired the minds of her own

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