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Image from page 117 of “The Muse” (1922)
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Identifier: muse1922sain
Title: The Muse
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors: Saint Mary’s School
Subjects: St. Mary’s School–Students–Yearbooks. St. Mary’s School–Periodicals. College yearbooks–North Carolina–Raleigh.
Publisher: Raleigh (N.C.): Saint Mary’s School.
Contributing Library: Saint Mary’s School
Digitizing Sponsor: North Carolina Digital Heritage Center

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he night out of her room at least once a week. (5) That she wouldnt be afraid to smoke (if she took the notion. )((i) That she never cracks a book. (7) That she does nothing but write letters in .Mr. Stones classes. (8) That she isnt at all shocked at anything she reads in the Tar Baby, PunchBowl, or Mink. (.)) That she hasnt any high shoes and overshoes ami doesnt intend to get any.( 1(1) That she really wasnt sick those two extra days she stayed home after XmasHolidays but merely attending the New Year dances— In other words that she is a flapper—very much worse than we bad atfirst imagined. L. A. E. €xtra! KEMEMBEE ?— The day we heard we could visit during the spring holidays! The day Miss Morgan gave the honor roll a banquet! The day we began going to the little store unchaperoned ! The day of Evelyns birthday party which began at 1.0:30 I. M.! The day we first bad dates in the parlor! The day the Yarborough Orchestra played at the Sophomores party! One Hundred Three E. H.

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Apt Quotations. Delays have dangerous ends.—Going to Breakfast.Bring me no more reports.—Helen Powell.A rare bird on earth.- Whitehead. Infinite riches in a little room.—Mary Louise in,I Martha.Wlio goeth a-horrowing, goeth a-sorrowins;. Anybody.Her siiuly was Inn little on the Bible.—Thursday Mornings.For litiii»- niori likes to hear herself converse. .1/. T. EverettOh, sin will sing the savageness mil of a bear.—Midge.Reproof on her lip, but a smile in her ryes.—Miss Morgan.Which I have earned from the sweat of my brow.- Seventy mi Miss Mor-gan s Psychology. Get money; still get money, boy, no matter by whal means. Budge mi Pay I)n ii. And n rn sir down to thai nourishment which is called supper.—SundayNights. I must I me a borrower of the night, for a dark hour or twain. — Before Exams. One hurried kiss, one last, one long embrace, one yearning look upon hertender face.- – (rushes. I have n passion For the name of Mary, for once ii was a magic sound tome.—Lenove

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Image from page 148 of “The boys’ revolt; a story of the street arabs of New York” (1894)
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Identifier: boysrevoltstoryo00otis
Title: The boys’ revolt; a story of the street arabs of New York
Year: 1894 (1890s)
Authors: Otis, James, 1848-1912 Hooper, W. P
Subjects: Children’s literature
Publisher: Boston, Estes and Lauriat
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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Jippy asked, curiously, The fellers chipped in to buy a bunch of flowers forAlice. The girl what sells em down here let me havethis for fifteen cents; cause it was the last she had, ancause it was for Sams sister. Then Joe pulled the paper apart a few inches to giveJippy a glimpse of the gift; and after that had been done,the party set out at a rapid pace for Mrs. Carletonshome, taking no heed whether the strikers saw them ornot, for they were too strong in numbers to fear anattack. On arriving at the house, Jippy led the way upstairs,and knocked softly, lest he should disturb the sick girl,little thinking that neither noise, nor pain, nor privationwould ever trouble her again. It was some moments before the door was opened,and then the visitors saw Jippys mother. Her facewas very grave, and she said, as she led the boys intothe room to the bedside where they saw a tiny formshrouded in white : — The messengers from the Father came for Sams

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THE BOYS CALLING AT MRS. CARLETONS. SAMS SISTER. 145 sister; and she is now safe among the angels in theglorious City of Light. The bright flowers, purchased from the hard earningsof the boys that a sufferer might be cheered by theirbeauty and fragrance, were placed in the waxen hands;and perhaps, as the white-winged angels looked backwhile carrying their tiny burden up to the Throne, theysaw the offering, and whispered among themselves thatas the kindly hearts had given, so should it be givenunto them again. CHAPTER XII. OPEN REVOLT. The night on which Denny Drakes name was erasedfrom the list of strikers proved an eventful one for theUnion. When the laborers turned over to the Boss Shinerthe money they had earned, and he decided that eachboy could have but ten cents, all were dissatisfied. The summary expulsion of Denny served to intimidatethem for a few moments; but the spark of distrust hadbeen ignited, and was being rapidly fanned into a flameby anger. It was at the most critical

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Image from page 427 of “Tales from Maria Edgeworth;” (1903)
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Identifier: talesfrommariaededge
Title: Tales from Maria Edgeworth;
Year: 1903 (1900s)
Authors: Edgeworth, Maria, 1767-1849 Dobson, Austin, 1840-1921 Thomson, Hugh, 1860-1920, ill
Subjects:
Publisher: [London] W. Gardner, Darton & co.
Contributing Library: Information and Library Science Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Digitizing Sponsor: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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have been punished enough, said the oldman ; forgive them, sir. Hardy looked as if he wished to speak. Not becauseyou ask it, said Mr. Trueman ; though I should be gladto oblige you—it wouldnt be just; but there, pointing toHardy, there is one who has merited a reward; thehighest I can give him is the pardon of his companions. 394 Tarlton Hardy bowed and his face glowed with pleasure, whilsteverybody present sympathized in his feelings. I am sure, thought Loveit, this is a lesson I shallnever forget. Gentlemen, said the old man, with a faltering voice, it wasnt for the sake of my apples that I spoke ; and you,sir, said he to Hardy, I thank you for saving my dog. Ifyou please, Ill plant on that mount, opposite the window, ayoung apple-tree, from my old one. I will water it, andtake care of it with my own hands for your sake, as long asI am able. And may God bless you ! laying his trem-bling hand on Hardys head ; may God bless you—Imsure God will bless all such boys as you are. 395

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<5fw 0oift(pf %©mcw Toute leur etude etait de se complaire et de sentraider. : Paul et Virginie. THE foot of a steep, slippery,white hill, near Dunstable, inBedfordshire, called Chalk Hill,there is a hut, or rather a hovel,which travellers could scarcelysuppose could be inhabited, ifthey did not see the smoke risingfrom its peaked roof. An oldwoman lives in this hovel, and} with her a little boy and girl, thechildren of a beggar, who died,these orphans perishing with hunger. Theythought themselves very happy the first time the good oldwoman took them into her hut, bid them warm themselvesat her small fire, and gave them a crust of mouldy bread tocat. She had not much to give, but what she had she gavewith good-will. She was very kind to these poor children,and worked hard at her spinning-wheel and at her knitting,to support herself and them. She earned money also inanother way. She used to follow all the carriages as they 1 Their whole study was how to please and to help one anot

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